Follow the butterflies

cosplayblog:

Anna from Frozen

Cosplayer: SproutChan [TM | DA | FB | WO]
Photographer: B+C Photography [TM | TW | FB]

vinegod:

DID HE FIND THEM?!?! by Gio Volpe

So close, and yet so far!

Natalie Dormer for Esquire Magazine (October 2013)

My personal goddess.

FINALLY SOMEONE GETS IT.

Anna Kendrick Birthday Countdown

» Day Two: Favorite Tweets

I’m not entirely sure what’s going on here, but I’m enjoying it immensely.

blxckbiird:

spaghetti-western-wannabe:

blxckbiird:

spaghetti-western-wannabe:

blxckbiird:

spaghetti-western-wannabe:

blxckbiird:

spaghetti-western-wannabe:

So I can either bake these cookies at 400 degrees for 10 minutes or 4,000 degrees for 1 minute.

nick nO THAT’S NOT HOW YOU BAKE COOKIES FRIEND

FLOOR IT?

NICK NO

HOW ABOUT 4,000,000 DEGREES FOR 1 SECOND

NICK YOU ARE GOING TO BURN YOUR HOUSE DOWN

I’M GOING TO HARNESS THE FUCKING SUN TO MAKE COOKIES

NICK P L E A S E

Someone post pics of the results. For science!

luisthegenius:

destroyedforcomfort:

bombasticunicorn:

thewomanfromitaly:

listengirlfriends:

When it comes to objectification, this is a great example of why comparing male strip clubs to Hooters is a “false equivalent.”

i’m creating a kickstarter for cojones right now

HOLY SHIT THO

omfg

If go there for breakfast, lunch, and dinner tbh

Yes, let’s all complain about how much we dislike Hooters and then turn around and make ourselves hypocrites in the same breath. SIGH. LADIES. Equality does not mean swinging the pendulum the other way and subjecting someone else to the treatment you yourself have come to despise. It means creating a balance where EVERYONE IS TREATED WITH THE SAME DECENCY AND RESPECT.

luisthegenius:

destroyedforcomfort:

bombasticunicorn:

thewomanfromitaly:

listengirlfriends:

When it comes to objectification, this is a great example of why comparing male strip clubs to Hooters is a “false equivalent.”

i’m creating a kickstarter for cojones right now

HOLY SHIT THO

omfg

If go there for breakfast, lunch, and dinner tbh

Yes, let’s all complain about how much we dislike Hooters and then turn around and make ourselves hypocrites in the same breath. SIGH. 

LADIES. Equality does not mean swinging the pendulum the other way and subjecting someone else to the treatment you yourself have come to despise. It means creating a balance where EVERYONE IS TREATED WITH THE SAME DECENCY AND RESPECT.

you dont tag trigger warnings?
Anonymous

uoa:

i always get shit when i talk about this but the reason i dont tag tw is bc

a) the term ‘trigger’ is meant to refer 2 those with PTSD those w severe anxiety and/or survivors of various forms of abuse it indicates an extreme reaction 2 certain stimulus like a panic attack/flashback/blackout caused by ur brain being unable to handle the resurgence of something horrific that happened to u 

b) with that being said, i dont post triggering content. i havent talked about serious triggering shit on this blog for a long time in fact i think the last time i tagged smth was when i reblogged this youtube video about domestic abuse probs like 6 months ago nowadays i just reblog pretty pictures and make fun of anons 

c) i get a thousand messages everyday from ppl suggesting i should tag shit like ‘spiders, ‘blood’, ‘feet’, ‘ghosts’, etc and it seriously pisses me off that u guys really believe ‘triggering’ equals ‘it makes me uncomfortable’ im not here to make tumblr a better place for u im not even getting paid man it’s ur responsibility to take care of yourself when it comes to these random ass ‘triggers’ if u cant see a gif of a ghost on ur dash you shouldn’t be online at all

d) in fact, ive come to the conclusion that demanding one of these lame ass trigger warnings it’s just a way 2 identify yourself as even more aware even more solicitous than the person who failed to ~adequately~ provide such a ridiculous warning. when i see ppl tagging ‘tw: spiders’ i cant help but think they are not demonstrating a sensitivity towards a topic but rather they just wanna be ‘seen’ doing so 2 demand that others ‘ought’ to do the same to validate one’s politics. this whole ’trigger’ business is less about protecting ppl from potentially re-traumatizing events and more 2 do with flagging up your right-on credentials even if it means silencing those who have actually gone through actual traumatizing events.

Well I’m glad someone finally said it. 

You’re  not triggered if you’re uncomfortable or if you find something distasteful or “icky.”  It’s not the new, hip thing. People who are triggered are experiencing a traumatic, gut-wrenching fear response in direct reaction to something they read/hear/see, and it is NOT to be taken lightly. In all honesty, every time I see something like “don’t use words like [insert curse or racial slur here], it triggers me,” or “please post triggers for things like spiders, they trigger me,” I want to slap people for being so friggin’ insensitive to the people out there who actually HAVE been through something traumatic enough to be genuinely triggered by something posted online.

If you’re doing it for the attention, PLEASE rethink what you’re doing and how you’re presenting yourself. You do a disservice both to the people who suffer the battle with PTSD everyday, and to yourself with this mockery you put forth.  Have some more respect for the genuinely affected, and yourselves.

madifit:

heylady222:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

This is very important

As someone who deals with anxiety, this is very important. These tips are great for everyone to know to help out their friends and hey maybe a stranger.

So very important.

madifit:

heylady222:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

This is very important

As someone who deals with anxiety, this is very important. These tips are great for everyone to know to help out their friends and hey maybe a stranger.

So very important.